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Wednesday, February 29

  1. page Solar System edited ... Neptune is the eighth (and farthest) planet from the sun and is a beautiful blue color. It is …
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    Neptune is the eighth (and farthest) planet from the sun and is a beautiful blue color. It is known for having two storms called the “great dark spot” and the “little dark spot”. It is named after Neptune, the Roman god of the sea and its symbol is Neptune's trident. It was discovered September 23, 1846 and was the first planet discovered by mathematical prediction.
    Dwarf Planets: Planets, according to the most recent definition, must meet three requirements. They must 1) be a celestial body orbiting the sun that is 2) massive enough to be rounded by it’s own gravity and have 3) cleared it’s orbital region of debris. Three large objects in our solar system meet the first two of these requirements but not the third so they are called dwarf planets. They are Ceres, Pluto, and Eris. The term dwarf planet was adopted in 2006.
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    or minor plaets.planets. They are
    How did the solar system get here?
    One explanation for the formation of the solar system is called the Nebular Hypothesis. First suggested in the 1700s by Pierre Laplace, this idea has been modified slightly since that time and is still the most common hypothesis. It suggests that our solar system began as a nebula (a huge cloud of gas and dust in space) that began to spin and collapse due to gravity. As the nebula spun faster and faster, a protostar began to form in the center. A disk of gas and dust surrounded the protostar and this disk was warmer at the center than at the edges. Clumps of matter began to form slowly as particles of gas and dust collided and stuck together (called accretion). These clumps, called planetesimals, that formed closest the center contained rocky elements. The lighter elements were blown away from the center and began to accumulate in the outer planetesimals. Collisions of particles and, occasionally, planetesimals, resulted in the planets, asteroids, and other solar system bodies we see today.
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    9:22 am

Tuesday, February 14

  1. page Solar System edited ... {Mars.jpg} Mars is the fourth planet from the sun. The planet is named after the Roman god o…
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    {Mars.jpg}
    Mars is the fourth planet from the sun. The planet is named after the Roman god of war. It is called the red planet because of the red color on it's surface which is caused by iron oxide (rust). Mars is a terrestrial planet with a thin carbon dioxide atmosphere. It is the site of the highest known mountain, Olympus Mons, and the biggest canyon, Valley Marinaris, in the solar system.
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    in a belt,belt known as the asteroid belt,belt between Mars and Jupiter. One asteroid,The largest of asteroids in this region, Ceres, the largest
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    for it’s volcanos.volcanoes. Europa has
    Saturn is the sixth planet from the sun and is famous for it’s beautiful rings. The other gas giants have rings, too, but not nearly as attractive. It is the second biggest planet in the solar system. This planet is named after the Roman god Saturnas. One of Saturn’s moons, Titan, is the only moon known to have a well developed atmosphere.
    Uranus, named after the greek deity of the sky, is the seventh planet from the sun and is the third largest. It’s most notable characteristic is that it orbits the sun on it’s side with a 98 degree tilt. It’s blue-green disk is visible to the naked eye but ancient astronomers could not see it because it slow orbit and its dimness. Sir William Herschel announced its discovery March 13, 1781.
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    12:15 pm

Monday, February 13

  1. page home edited ... Welcome! My intent is to use this page as a resource point for information to be used in my …
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    Welcome!
    My intent is to use this page as a resource point for information to be used in my Earth Science Class
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    edited by me.me and contains the basic information covered in science class for each topic.
    For information regarding assignments, handouts, note pages, the instructor (me!) or the class, please visit my homepage at:
    Earth Science Rocks!
    Click on these other important links:
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    Observatory {WebLogo.jpg} Alternate Earth Science
    Sincerely,
    Mr. Idema
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    11:34 am

Monday, December 12

  1. page The Moon edited ... General Information: When you look at the full moon, it is hard to believe that it is around …
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    General Information:
    When you look at the full moon, it is hard to believe that it is around 400,000 km away from Earth. With a diameter of almost 3,500 km, the moon is approximately 1/4 the size of Earth (Earth's diameter = 12,800 km) and has a gravity only 1/6 that of Earth’s. Imagine playing volleyball on the moon - your waist would be as high as the top of the net when you jumped up to spike the ball!
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    facing us! This long "day" and "night", about two Earth weeks each, along with no atmosphere, causes the daytime high temperature to reach a staggering 107 degrees C and the nighttime low to reach -153 degrees C. The moon's
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    to Earth (363,300 Km) is called
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    farthest away (405,500 Km) is called
    So where did the moon come from? Theories of how the moon came into existence might be considered “historical science” since we can only infer what happened based on observations we can make today. One of the most common theories is that the moon resulted when another large object (asteroid or small planet) in the same nebula from which Earth formed struck the Earth. The asteroid, about the size of Mars, collided with Earth, maybe forming the depression where the Pacific Ocean is today. As a result of the collision, a chunk broke off and formed the moon. A second theory is that the moon was an asteroid that was "captured" when it passed too close to the Earth. Can you think of other explanations for the moon's origin?
    Main Surface Features:
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    7:26 am
  2. page The Moon edited ... General Information: When you look at the full moon, it is hard to believe that it is around …
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    General Information:
    When you look at the full moon, it is hard to believe that it is around 400,000 km away from Earth. With a diameter of almost 3,500 km, the moon is approximately 1/4 the size of Earth (Earth's diameter = 12,800 km) and has a gravity only 1/6 that of Earth’s. Imagine playing volleyball on the moon - your waist would be as high as the top of the net when you jumped up to spike the ball!
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    facing us! The moon's orbit isn't a perfect circle. The point in it's orbit when it passes closest to Earth is called perigee and the point when it passes farthest away is called apogee (think "Apogee Away").
    So where
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    the moon wasresulted when another large object (asteroid or small planet) in the
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    which Earth formed.formed struck the Earth. The asteroid,
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    the moon. A second theory is that the moon was an asteroid that was "captured" when it passed too close to the Earth. Can you
    Main Surface Features:
    The main surface features on the moon include highlands, maria, craters, rays, and rilles. Highlands are the lighter surfaces of the moon. They are areas of high or mountainous land - some are thousands of meters high! They are made of felspar-rich rock. Maria are the broad, smooth lowland plains that are filled with dense rock called basalt. It is thought that they were made from ancient lava flows. They are also called "seas" since that is what they looked like to early astronomers and since maria is the Latin word for sea. Craters are large circular depressions made by meteor impacts. They range in size from microscopic to hundreds of kilometers in diameter. Rays are light colored lines radiating out from craters. Rilles are long winding valleys. They are fissures or narrow channels on the moon's surface that might have been formed from rivers of lava.
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    4:52 am

Tuesday, December 6

  1. page The Moon edited ... The base would allow people to live on the moon, and from there we could launch missions to Ma…
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    The base would allow people to live on the moon, and from there we could launch missions to Mars, because the moon’s gravity is only 1/6 as strong as Earth’s.
    There is ice at the poles of the moon. Astronauts could use it for fuel and air. No one said they would use it for water, but maybe that’s just given.
    {LunarCraters.jpeg}
    Written /researched by Laurel Markert, Kaitlyn Jacobs, and Pete Idema
    Edited by Pete Idema Dec. 2010
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    http://www.nasa.gov
    http://science.howstuffworks.com/moon4.htm
    {Mar17-11MoonSm.png}
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    9:34 pm
  2. 9:33 pm
  3. page The Moon edited ... The main surface features on the moon include highlands, maria, craters, rays, and rilles. Hig…
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    The main surface features on the moon include highlands, maria, craters, rays, and rilles. Highlands are the lighter surfaces of the moon. They are areas of high or mountainous land - some are thousands of meters high! They are made of felspar-rich rock. Maria are the broad, smooth lowland plains that are filled with dense rock called basalt. It is thought that they were made from ancient lava flows. They are also called "seas" since that is what they looked like to early astronomers and since maria is the Latin word for sea. Craters are large circular depressions made by meteor impacts. They range in size from microscopic to hundreds of kilometers in diameter. Rays are light colored lines radiating out from craters. Rilles are long winding valleys. They are fissures or narrow channels on the moon's surface that might have been formed from rivers of lava.
    Moon Phases: {MoonPhase.jpg}
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    shadowed half. TheThere isn’t a
    During a full moon the Earth is between the sun and moon, so the lighted side of the moon faces us. When the sun, Earth, and moon line up so that the moon is in Earth’s shadow, then we have a lunar eclipse. These occur somewhere on Earth a couple times per year on average.
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    they work. When half the lighted side of the moon faces Earth we have a quarter moon (first quarter is when the light is on the right, last quarter is when the light is on the left) Gibbous moons are when more than half but less than full lighted half of the moon faces Earth. Crescent moons are when the moon is between New and Quarter. It takes 29.5 days to complete one full set of moon phases.
    Tides:
    Tides occur because of the gravitational pull of both the sun and moon, but the moon's gravity has a much bigger influence on our tides. High tides happen because the moon is pulling on the Earth. The water near the moon is pulled slightly, causing a high tide. The moon also pulls on the Earth itself, so the Earth pulls toward the moon on the other side causing a high tide there as well. There are 2 high tides and 2 low tides on a point on Earth every 24 hours and 50 minutes.
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    9:31 pm

Thursday, November 17

  1. page Watershed CRM (deleted) edited
    8:25 am
  2. page The Sun edited ... Core: The core is HOT! Temperatures near the center of the core must be 15 million degrees Cel…
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    Core: The core is HOT! Temperatures near the center of the core must be 15 million degrees Celsius. With these temperatures and pressures of a billion pounds per square inch nuclear fusion can take place. In this fusion reaction, four atoms of hydrogen fuse to form one atom of helium and energy. This energy leaves the inner core and travels through the Radiative Zone which begins about 175,000 Km from the center of the sun.
    Radiative & Convection Zone: The radiative zone is where the intense heat produced in the inner core is transferred away from it's source. It extends for about 300,000 Km before giving way to the convection zone. In this zone convection currents begin to develop creating convection cells where hot gas rises. Cooler gas falls and begins to heat up. The result of these convection cells are what scientists call "granulation" which describes the contrast of the red and orange areas on the visible surface.
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    2001 so when would you expect the next peak could be expected in 2012.to occur. How about the one after that?
    Chromosphere: The reddish layer of the sun's atmosphere, the chromosphere, rests above the photosphere and extends for several thousand kilometers. Temperatures average 27,000 degrees Celsius. On occasion heated gas explodes into space forming twisted loops. These loops of heated gas are called Prominences. Sometimes they fall back into the sun, other times they break free and drift into space. Another solar storm is called a solar flare. These are bursts of light from super hot spots on the sun's surface. They look like bright yellow/white "spots" on the surface in the picture above.
    Corona: The outer-most layer of the sun (and the least dense) is the corona. Temperatures in the corona reach 1,700,000 degrees Celsius. The cool thing about this layer is that it can only be observed during a total solar eclipse or with special equipment. When it is visible, it appears as a ghostly, glowing region that lacks regular shape. It is far less bright than the other regions of the sun so we cannot see it when viewing the sun with solar filters. Solar wind (a continuous stream of high-energy particles) leaves the sun from the corona and travels in all directions at incredible speeds (350 - 700 km/sec or 217 - 434 miles/sec).
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    8:23 am

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